Category Archives: Children and Grief

Children and Grief: Informative articles on how to help a child cope with the grieving process.

How to support grieving college students – Part 2

[Editor: In anticipation of today’s AfterTalk BlogTalk Radio program featuring Dr. David Fajgenbaum and his colleague Dr. Heather Servaty-Seib, we are reprinting their two-part article on supporting grieving college students. You can listen to the initial broadcast at 3pm today, November 18. at AfterTalkLIVE on BlogTalk Radio or later in the archive. To listen, click this link: AfterTalk LIVE

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How to support grieving college students – Part 1

Editor: In anticipation of tomorrow’s AfterTalk BlogTalk Radio program featuring Dr. David Fajgenbaum and his colleague Dr. Heather Servaty-Seib, we are reprinting their two-part article on supporting grieving college students. You can listen to the initial broadcast at 3pm tomorrow, November 18 at AfterTalkLIVE on BlogTalk Radio, or later in the AfterTalkLive archive.  To listen, click this link:

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A Son Reflects on Father’s Cancer Death

[Editor: a 27 year-old first year medical student was given the assignment of writing a personal reflection on an encounter he or a family member had with the healthcare system and what he might have learned from it. I thought it would be helpful to those who have lost someone to terminal cancer and wonder

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A Daughter, Grieving and Food

Memories do not always appear conveniently. Often, you can’t find them during a therapeutic conversation. Shortly afterwards, you can find yourself thrust into a grief ridden flashback, in the middle of your busy day, and completely alone. Recently, I was reading a book for school on “the globalization of the American psyche.” I had just

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A Private Memory of my Dad

Sharing Something That’s a Private Memory I was walking home from high school, and I bumped into one of my mother’s friends. She said there was a surprise waiting for me at home, and that I would be very happy. I walked into my apartment, and my dad was there – back from the hospital

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